SAADA

"From Hooghly to Harlem" Unisex T-Shirt

$45.00
Tax included.
Color: Solid Black Triblend
Size: XS
Size Guide

Kruttika Susarla’s artwork for “From Hooghly to Harlem” was inspired by the story of Bardu Ali—a jazz musician, promoter, and emcee credited for recognizing the talent of Ella Fitzgerald—and his father’s journey "From Hooghly to Mississippi to Harlem," as written in Vivek Bald’s essay for Our Stories.

What's the story?

"In the 1880s and the 1910s, a small number of men from Hooghly and Calcutta settled in southern U.S. cities and married local African American and Afro-Creole women. This was the case with Bardu Ali’s father. Moksad Ali was one of the earliest Bengali traders to settle in New Orleans in the 1880s. There, he married a young woman named Ella Blackman. Ella Blackman Ali and her five children traveled northward along with thousands of African Americans from the southern states to New York City and eventually settled in Harlem.

"In turn, Bardu Ali—one of the earliest second-generation South Asian Americans—spent a lifetime in Black show business. Bardu quickly made a name for himself in theatrical and musical circles as a suave and crowd-pleasing emcee, and in the 1930s was recruited by the swing jazz bandleader Chick Webb." -pp. 280-281 of Our Stories

Read more about Bardu Ali in the essay "From Hooghly to Mississippi to Harlem" in Our Stories.

What's it made of?

• 50% polyester, 25% combed ring-spun cotton, 25% rayon
• Fabric weight: 3.4 oz/yd² (115.3 g/m²)
• Pre-shrunk for extra durability
• 40 singles
• Regular fit
• Side-seamed construction

How will it fit?

The tri-blend fabric creates a vintage, fitted look. And extreme durability makes this t-shirt withstand repeated washings and still remain super comfortable.

KRUTTIKA SUSARLA X SAADA

From Hooghly to Harlem

“The Ali family’s story demonstrates just how entwined the lives of some early South Asian migrants became with those of members of the African diaspora.” -p. 280 of Our Stories

Kruttika Susarla’s artwork for “From Hooghly to Harlem” was inspired by the story of Bardu Ali—a jazz musician, promoter, and emcee credited for recognizing the talent of Ella Fitzgerald. 

The artwork highlights the different stops in his father’s journey from Hooghly to Harlem, including periods in New Orleans and Waveland, Mississippi.

About the Artwork